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  #11  
Old 04-26-2012, 11:46 AM
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hokiealumnus hokiealumnus is offline
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Patch seems to think his 980X was soldered, no photo though.

If soldering is cheaper, they should use it. No TIM has the thermal properties of solder unless they have come up with something not even close to what is commercially avaliable. Shin Etsu - 6.0W/mK. Indigo Extreme is the best on the market that I can find, claiming > 20W/mK. Intel's patent doesn't rate the conductivity, but solder is capable of well north of 80+W/mK. If it's cheaper, why not use it?
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  #12  
Old 04-26-2012, 12:59 PM
Raja@ASUS Raja@ASUS is offline
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There's always the chance this new process tech are sensitive to Indium based thermal materials. Pure conjecture at this point of course.
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  #13  
Old 04-26-2012, 01:17 PM
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That very well could be, which is why we've asked Intel for any comment on the matter. We're awaiting their response.
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  #14  
Old 04-26-2012, 01:46 PM
Pt1t Pt1t is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OBR_CZ View Post
this is not new! sandy Bridge/nehalem is not soldered too! Alle CPUs from Intel few years ago are with TIM, not soldered!

sandy Bridge datasheet: http://www.intel.com/content/dam/doc...cket-guide.pdf

ivy bridge datasheet: http://www.intel.com/content/dam/www...cket-guide.pdf

all has TIM between IHS/Core

On Clarkdale it was also thermal paste but on SB i 'm not sure.
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  #15  
Old 04-26-2012, 02:21 PM
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Just took another look at their patent and it references the solder as consisting of gold & tin @ 80/20 ratios (See 7th page down, column 3, 2nd full paragraph.)
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  #16  
Old 04-26-2012, 04:58 PM
xoqolatl xoqolatl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raja@ASUS View Post
There's always the chance this new process tech are sensitive to Indium based thermal materials. Pure conjecture at this point of course.
Package is flip-chip, so logic layers are on the bottom of the die, facing the substrate. Solder would only be touching pure silicon, which is definitely not sensitive.
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  #17  
Old 04-26-2012, 05:09 PM
Raja@ASUS Raja@ASUS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xoqolatl View Post
Package is flip-chip, so logic layers are on the bottom of the die, facing the substrate. Solder would only be touching pure silicon, which is definitely not sensitive.
I was thinking more proximity and any stray issues. Guess we will find out more when/if Intel speaks.
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  #18  
Old 04-26-2012, 05:11 PM
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The Tech Report was able to get a comment from Intel. It's not exactly conclusive, but does shed a little light.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Tech Report
Curious, we asked Intel about the interface between the Ivy Bridge die and the heat spreader. Intel has confirmed to TR that Ivy uses a "different package thermal technology" than Sandy Bridge. The firm stopped short of answering our questions about why the change was made and how the thermal transfer properties of the two materials compare. However, Intel claims the combination of the new interface material and Ivy's higher thermal density is responsible for the higher temperatures users are observing with overclocked CPUs.

Intel also points out Ivy Bridge has a higher TjMAX specification, which governs when the CPU starts throttling in order to protect itself from heat damage. The cut-off for the Core i7-3770K is 105C, while the 2600K starts throttling at 100C.
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  #19  
Old 04-26-2012, 09:57 PM
Shammy Shammy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ME4ME View Post
any gain in CPU clock?
on this cpu
air yes
ln2 no (maybe heat wasnt its hurdle on this one)
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  #20  
Old 04-27-2012, 08:01 AM
OBR_CZ OBR_CZ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shammy View Post
on this cpu
air yes
ln2 no (maybe heat wasnt its hurdle on this one)
most important here is, how much on air? 20C, 10C, or 100 MHz higher ... or so?
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